Bells of Peace to Ring November 11

November 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For centuries, church bells have been rung to mark joyous occasions – weddings, coronations and the arrival of peace after war. This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the signing of the First World War armistice on November 11, 1918. To mark the occasion, the Kirk and all Charlottetown places of worship that are fitted with bells, will ring them 100 times at sunset, 4:44 pm. Similar bell ringing will take place across Canada at local sunset time.

This ringing of the “Bells of Peace” is a joint project of Veterans Affairs Canada and the Royal Canadian Legion. Says the Legion: “The Royal Canadian Legion was born from the ashes of the First World War. As Canada’s largest veterans’ organization and in partnership with Veterans Affairs Canada, we have been handed this torch of remembrance by our founders to hold high and to never forget the sacrifices made in the name of Canada and for Canadians. On 11 November 2018, 100 years will have passed since the signing of the armistice that officially ended [the First World War]. As a tribute to all Canadians that served in this horrific struggle we are producing a program of remembrance for those from that era — an event that allows Canadians, if only for a moment, to stop, to remember and to feel, perhaps for a second, the joy that peace brought after so much death and destruction.… Our hope is all who hear the Bells will stop and focus on the loss and sacrifice both on the battlefield and at home.”

At the Kirk, the ringing of the “Bells of Peace” is being organized by Heritage Committee member Ian Scott. He will be joined by a number of congregation members at sunset on November 11 to toll the Kirk’s bell and remember all those who fought and served in the First World War, and especially the eight members of the Kirk family who made the ultimate sacrifice during that devastating conflict.

Ellen Burnett Teaching in Cape Dorset

October 2018

Entrance to the Sam Pudlat Elementary School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kirk member Ellen Burnett, daughter of Deanne and Robertson Burnett, is spending the 2018-2019 school year teaching Grade Six at the Sam Pudlat School in the hamlet of Cape Dorset, Nunavut. After graduating from St. Francis Xavier with a Bachelor of Science degree and studying Education at Acadia University this past year, Ellen decided to opt for the adventure and better pay checks of a northern Canadian assignment, instead of attempting to get local substitute teaching work. Said Ellen: “If I was to start working in the Maritimes this year, I would establish myself, I would get comfy cozy in my routine, and for the rest of my life, I would probably never leave. If I’m going to do something ‘different’, I figure this year is the year to do it. Good or bad, I know it will be a very interesting experience to look back on.”

Ellen arrived in Nunavut on September 6, “a little nervous and a lot excited.” She soon found that new surroundings were a lot different from PEI. “There are no paved roads here; everything, including the airport runway, is gravelly and dirt, which means everything is either really dusty or really muddy all the time…. Other than that the landscape is mainly either jagged rock or water. All the buildings are built up on stilts a metre or two off the ground. I suspect this is to avoid flooding in the spring but I have not had the opportunity to ask yet. There are no road names here, as there is no need; every apartment has a number and every major building has a name.”

Ellen is sharing a three bedroom apartment that is nice and spacious. It is located right across from the high school and a 4-5 minute walk from her elementary school. Her roommates, Eric, Cale and Cale, are fellow Acadia students. They are getting used to having water delivered – it has already run out on them once during a snow day – and are acclimatizing to the different food prices: a regular box of Cheerios is $14.00 and a large bag of chips for snack time will set you back $8.00.

As for the teaching, Ellen says: “It’s not easy, but I didn’t expect it to be. Education is not viewed in the same light as it is at home, but routines are starting to come together and relationships are being built. Some days are rougher than others but overall things are steadily improving as my students and I continue to understand each other better…. One thing that took some getting used to is that the kids often use faces to say yes or no instead of a nod or shake. The face for yes is eyebrows raised, kind of like a confused face to me, which was tricky at the start! The face for no is (a) scrunched up nose so it almost looks like they are angry with you. Very confusing at first — still takes me a second but I am getting the hang of it now.”

“Last night (for Thanksgiving) we had a potluck with teachers from both the elementary and high school. It was an enjoyable gathering during which we goofed off a bunch and everybody ate lots (let’s be real, way too much) of really delicious food. We scored a turkey carcass and my soup is on the stove as we speak, which I am pumped about.”

As for her experience up north so far, Ellen says: “I am enjoying it up here so far. I do miss fall at home, but as I was saying to someone earlier this week, you know, it’s windy, there’s salt water, there’s quite a bit of sand… it’s basically PEI add mountains, minus trees and minus about 15 degrees of warmth!”

Rev. Amanda New Moderator of the Presbytery of PEI

September 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

During its annual meeting, held at Summerside Presbyterian Church on Tuesday, September 11, 2018, Rev. Amanda Henderson-Bolton was inducted as the new Moderator of the Presbytery of Prince Edward Island. Rev. Amanda succeeds the Rev. Brad Blaikie, Minister of Summerside Presbyterian Church, in that role.

During the induction ceremony, Rev. Brad said: “I’ve noticed at events like this that the outgoing Moderator often gives the incoming Moderator a gift … often a beverage, and frequently alcoholic in nature. So I went out and purchased something suitable. Then I heard Rev. Amanda’s good news [that she is expecting in February 2019] and decided that what I had bought wouldn’t do. I had to drink it myself!” Instead of the unnamed libation, Rev. Brad bought Rev. Amanda a box of chocolates and a Rock and Roll Baby Names book, which were presented to general laughter.

The Moderator presides at bi-monthly meetings of the Presbytery, which is made up of Ministers and Representative Elders drawn from PEI’s 25 Presbyterian churches and charges. According to the Book of Forms, “the duty of the Moderator is to constitute the court and preside, to open and close the meetings with prayer, to preserve order, to take the vote, to announce decisions, to pronounce censures, to sign the minutes when sustained, to instruct parties to judicial process, to call meetings for emergent business and generally to direct the business of the court.”

Rev. Amanda came to the Presbytery of PEI in 2014 and most recently has been very active in the Camp and Business Committees of the Presbytery. It is a sign of the high regard in which Rev. Amanda is held that she is being called to assume the Moderator’s chair at such an early juncture in her ministry career.

A native of Pictou County, Nova Scotia, Rev. Amanda earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Stephen’s University (2005), spent time in the Iona Community in Scotland, studied for a Master of Divinity degree from Acadia Divinity College (2009) and a Master of Arts degree from Acadia University (2010). After that she studied for 18 months at McGill/Presbyterian College in Montreal. She accepted a call to the Kirk of St. James in 2014, and lives in Charlottetown with her husband Chad, who is a candidate for ministry, as well as her two dogs and cat.

Wedding Gallery

Kelly and Gary MacWilliams were married at the Kirk of St. James on July 1, 2016.

Kelly and Gary MacWilliams were married at the Kirk of St. James on July 1, 2016.

Kelly and Gary MacWilliams were married at the Kirk of St. James on July 1, 2016.

Kelly and Gary MacWilliams were married at the Kirk of St. James on July 1, 2016.

Kelly and Gary MacWilliams were married at the Kirk of St. James on July 1, 2016.

Kelly and Gary MacWilliams were married at the Kirk of St. James on July 1, 2016.

Chris Moase and Michelle Martell were married at the Kirk of St. James by Rev. Dr. John R. Cameron on August 8, 2008.

Rebecca Allan and David Wooldridge were married at the Kirk of St. James on May 11, 2002.

Dawna Wooldridge and Sheldon White were married at the Kirk of St. James on August 2nd, 1997.

Pamela Stewart and Lorne MacKinnon were married at the Kirk on August 20th, 1988.

Pamela Stewart and Lorne MacKinnon were married at the Kirk on August 20th, 1988.

Pamela Stewart and Lorne MacKinnon were married at the Kirk on August 20th, 1988.

 

Jane Larkin and Donald Wooldridge were married by Rev. Malcolm McCuaig at the Kirk of St. James on October 23, 1971.

Alan & Patsy Scales were married at the Kirk on July 6, 1963.

Douglas Cudmore and Frances Clark were married at the Kirk of St. James by Rev. Frank MacLean on June 6, 1959.

Douglas Cudmore and Frances Clark were married at the Kirk of St. James by Rev. Frank MacLean on June 6, 1959.

Douglas Cudmore and Frances Clark were married at the Kirk of St. James by Rev. Frank MacLean on June 6, 1959.

Margaret Martin and Ralph Dumont were married at the Kirk on August 7, 1947. Margaret was a child of the Church (baptized in 1922), while Ralph joined the Church through the Kirk Sea Rover Crew in the late 1930’s.